If you have kidney disease, you may have problems with your blood vessels, making it hard to get dialysis. This is called renal failure and can happen suddenly or overtime. If you have renal failure, you will need dialysis treatments to filter your blood and remove waste. Dialysis access is a way to give yourself regular dialysis treatments at home. It involves making a small hole in your skin and inserting a catheter (tube) into your bloodstream. You can do this in several ways, and a Coconut Creek, FL nurse practitioner, will help you choose the best method for you. This article looks at some of the different forms of dialysis access.

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a type of dialysis that uses your peritoneum (the lining of your abdomen) to filter your blood. PD is usually done at home, and you will need to have a catheter inserted into your peritoneum. PD is not suitable for everyone, and your doctor will help you decide if it is the best option for you.

If you choose to have PD, you will need regular checkups to ensure your catheter is working correctly and that there are no problems with your peritoneum. You will also need to watch for signs of infection, such as fever, chills, or pain around your catheter.

Hemodialysis

Hemodialysis (HD) is a type of dialysis that uses an artificial kidney (dialyzer) to filter your blood. HD is usually done at a dialysis center, and you will need to have a catheter inserted into your veins. HD is not suitable for everyone, and your doctor will help you decide if it is the best option for you.

If you choose to have HD, you will need regular checkups to ensure your catheter is working properly and that there are no problems with your veins. You will also need to watch for signs of infection, such as fever, chills, or pain around your catheter.

AV Fistula

An AV fistula is a type of dialysis access that uses your blood vessels to create a direct connection between an artery and a vein. It allows blood to flow directly from the artery to the vein, making it easier to remove wastes during dialysis. Your doctor can create an AV fistula surgically, or it can be created using a catheter.

If you choose to have an AV fistula, you will need regular checkups to ensure it is working correctly. You will also need to watch for signs of infection, such as fever, chills, or pain around the fistula.

Central Venous Catheter

A central venous catheter (CVC) is a type of dialysis access that uses a catheter to connect your veins to an artery. It allows blood to flow directly from the artery to the vein, making it easier to remove wastes during dialysis. A CVC can be placed in your chest or arm, and you will need to have it checked regularly to make sure it is working properly. You will also need to watch for signs of infection, such as fever, chills, or pain around the CVC.

In summary, there are several different types of dialysis access, and your doctor will help you choose the best option for you. Each type of dialysis has its risks and benefits, and you will need to have regular checkups to make sure your access is working correctly.